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Give a flannel board presentation.

Give a flannel board presentation.

1. Set up area with board.

2. Check pieces.

3. Practice.

4. Place pieces in order of appearance.

5. Gather children.

6. Place pieces out of sight.

7. Discuss what happened during the activity with children (optional).

8. Store set by keeping pieces flat instead of folded.

9. Introduce the set with a motivational statement if you wish.

F. What color flannel (or felt) would you use to cover your own board? Why?

G. Finish the following statements.

What is a dramatic play kit?

Answer the following questions related to speaking goals.

1. How can the goals of a program be met?

2. When children are interested in an object or event, what should the teacher do to help the children learn while they are motivated?

C. Define dramatic play.

D. Answer the following questions.

1. What is a dramatic play kit?

2. Name some of the things a teacher does not want to happen during show-and-tell time (for example, one child talking too long).

Write down teacher questions that could lead a child to a discovery and promote the child’s verbal expression of the discovery in the following situations.

1. A bird’s nest is found in the yard.

2. The wheel on a bike squeaks.

3. A flashlight is taken apart.

I. Formulate appropriate teacher comments in the following situations (1–3).

1. The child is complaining that easel paint drips and does not stay where he wants it.

2. It is cleanup time, and Sharie (child) says, “Scott and Keith never put anything away!”

3. Carter is talking about the way water is disappearing in the sun. For 4, 5, and 6, formulate a possible convergent-type teacher question.

Write a short paragraph that finishes the following

Megan noticed a bug on the floor.

1. Christa says, “Dana has new shoes!”

2. Ryan brings a toy truck to share at group time. In 7, 8, and 9, plan evaluation questions that a teacher might use.

3. “I don’t like peanut butter,” Romana says.

4. “This is my favorite book,” Linsey declares.

5. Teacher is introducing a new toy containing plastic boats.

J. List three of Costa’s characteristics of intelligent behavior.

K. Write a short paragraph that finishes the following: The reasons some teachers do not actively plan programs with children leading activities in front of the child group.

 

Why are finger plays so popular with young children?

A. Finish the following:

1. A transitional statement at the end of group time is necessary because.

2. History shows that chants and choruses were used for.

3. A successful circle time for young children can be described by the following terms:

B. Why are finger plays so popular with young children?

C. Rearrange and place the following statements in the best order or sequence.

1. Child knows words and actions of a finger play.

2. Teacher knows words and actions of a finger play.

3. Teacher practices finger play.

4. Child participates with actions only.

5. Child watches.

6. Teacher presents finger play to children.

7. Teacher evaluates the results of the finger play.

 

List five signals or attention getters that a teacher could use at the beginning of a circle time.

Teacher encourages children to join in actions and words.

D. List five signals or attention getters that a teacher could use at the beginning of a circle time.

E. In what ways should an assistant teacher be helpful when another teacher is leading group language activities?

F. Rate the following teacher statements during planned circles. G 5 Good Technique P 5 Poor Technique 1. “It’s my turn to talk.”

2. “Stop wiggling, Jimmy.”

3. “Everyone’s listening; it’s time to begin.”

4. “When Mackenzie, Tran, and Nan join us, we’ll all be together.”

5. “The first one standing can be the first one to leave the circle.”

6. “We’re finished. Let’s go.”

7. “Speak up, Gisela. It’s time to answer.”

8. “Thuy is doing our new finger play the….

“Can anyone else think of what might happen to Orville on the ground outside?”

Mr. T. (teacher) has noticed a puppet lying on the ground in the playground. He picks it up, examines it, and puts it in his pocket. During circle time, he says, “Orville (puppet’s name) was on the ground in the yard today. Raise your hand if you know where he should be put after we play with him. Olivia, I see your hand. Would you please put Orville in the place in the classroom that’s just for him? Thank you, Olivia. What could happen to Orville, our puppet, if we left him on the floor or ground?” “He’d get stepped on,” Thad offers. “That could happen, Thad,” said Mr. T. “Can anyone else think of what might happen to Orville on the ground outside?” Mr. T. continues. “The….

Does anyone know what rabbits look like?

Mrs. G. (teacher) pulled a small puppet from her smock pocket. Reaching behind Mark, age 3, she talked through the puppet. “Mark Allen Graham! Rupert sees what you’re doing, and he doesn’t like children who break crayons.” Mark returns the crayon to the container.

1. Miss R. (teacher) is introducing a small group of children to an activity involving a poem on a chart. “Well, there’s Abby, Molly, Sam, Scott, Adam, Renee, and Jonathan,” Miss R. begins. The puppet in her hand moves and claps, and the puppet’s voice is low pitched and deep. “I came to talk to you about rabbits. Does anyone know what rabbits look like? I live in a pocket, you know. I’ve heard about rabbits, but I’ve never seen one.”

 

Describe a print-rich classroom.

What are some possible reasons that children ages 2 to 5 years may start to print?

1. What should teachers consider about the print script form they use?

2. Muscle control is only part of learning to write. What other factors affect readiness for written communication?

3. When a child says, “Is this M?” how should one reply?

4. If a child says a b is an f, what might a teacher say?

C. Describe a print-rich classroom.

D. Answer the following questions.

1. If a child goes to a teacher to show letters she has drawn, how should the teacher react?

2. If two children are arguing over the name of a letter, how should the teacher handle the situation?

3. List three ways a teacher can….

Explain what is meant by each of the following terms—reading readiness, reading method, phonics, configuration, and incongruities.

Think about the following situations briefly. What words or actions you would take?

1. A child asks you to listen while he reads a favorite book to you.

2. You have noticed a young child who is able to read all of the printscript in the playroom.

3. A parent notices his child is reading a few words and asks advice as to what to do.

B. Describe sight reading in a short paragraph.

C. Explain what is meant by each of the following terms—reading readiness, reading method, phonics, configuration, and incongruities.

D. Select the phrase that best completes each of the following sentences.