You will develop a clear and well-articulated personal philosophy statement on teaching and learning which will be the foundation for all of your teaching practices

Assessment 1: Personal Philosophy Statement 1800 words 30%

You will develop a clear and well-articulated personal philosophy statement on teaching and learning which will be the foundation for all of your teaching practices. In this personal philosophy statement, you will share your views as the purpose of teaching and the theories that guide you as a teacher. This statement will articulate related examples of practice for teaching and learning that reflect your purpose and your supported theories.

In this statement you will:

    • Articulate your personal views and beliefs as the purpose of teaching and learning,
    • Identify and relate the specific educational theories, philosophies and ideas that guide you as a teacher, and
    • Describe teaching practice examples that align with your purpose and theoretical beliefs..
    • Write in the first person to reflect your own voice and personality.
    • Include at least six references. All references should be included in-text and in the reference list.
    • Consult the rubric as you write your philosophy statement.
  • Please see Assessment Rubric
  • Please submit your assessment
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What is the difference between acceptable reasons and sufficient reasons? Give an example of reasons that are sufficient to believe something but not acceptable.

What is the difference between acceptable reasons and sufficient reasons? Give an example of reasons that are sufficient to believe something but not acceptable. Could evidence be overridden without being….

In each of the following, several epistemic reasons are given to believe something. Which is the strongest reason? What makes it stronger? a. John, Susan, and Terry all believe that the bank robber was a male. John was there during the robbery and saw the robber. Susan read about the robbery in the newspaper. Susan told Terry about the robbery. b. John and Susan both believe that the acid caused the chemical reaction. John read in a textbook about the likely causes of such a reaction. Susan performed several experiments to rule out other possible causes. c. Susan and Terry both believe that their checking accounts are overdrawn. Terry got a phone call from his bank telling him about his balance. Susan noticed it when she was balancing her checkbook last night. d. John and Susan believe that some early settlers in New England suffered real hardships. John read some original diaries written by early settlers. Susan saw a documentary on TV. e. John and Susan both believe that building a new bridge will greatly reduce the current traffic problems. John based his belief on a comparison of the proposed bridge and the traffic problems to those in other cities. Susan believes it because she heard the city planners claim that the bridge would reduce traffic problems. f. John and Susan both believe that raising the minimum wage would lead to higher unemployment among the very poor. John believes it because he thinks that it follows from what he learned in his economics class. Susan believes it because she works in an unemployment office and has seen the unemployment lines grow after the wage has been raised in the past. In (a) in (C), if the belief had been that the robber was a male with a long criminal record, then Susan’s belief would have been better justified than John’s, since it is hard to tell just by looking whether someone has a criminal record, but this is the kind of information a newspaper report would get right. For each of the other questions in (C), change the shared belief but not the kind of evidence each character relied on, so that the other person’s reasons are stronger.

In each of the following, several epistemic reasons are given to believe something. Which is the strongest reason? What makes it stronger? a. John, Susan, and Terry all believe that….

Explain how a condition that is sufficient might not also be necessary. Give an example to illustrate your answer.

(When you answer these questions, pretend that you are explaining or teaching the answer to a friend who is not in the class. Doing that will force you to put….