Daily Archives: January 25, 2022

Does the statement provide a good justification for not using a model when thinking about the supply side of the economy?

Read the following statement and then answer the questions below: 'Just by looking at realworld labour markets, it is obvious they are far too complex to be accurately modelled by either the efficiency wage model or the textbook model with complete contracts'. [Hintz the textbook model is set out in the Appendix]

(a) Does the statement provide a good justification for not using a model when thinking about the supply side of the economy?

(b) What are the key predictions of the efficiency wage model and the textbook model with complete contracts?

(c) The predictions of which model more closely match what we observe by analysing real world data? Provide examples to justify your answer.

leading and working with others

Activity 16.3 Revised skills and experience audit

You began to consider your strengths and weaknesses in Chapter 1. Go back to that now.

Use the list of key skills outlined there to update your lists of strengths and weaknesses.

These skills include:

● number

● communication

● information skills

● leading and working with others

● learning

● problem solving.

You may now be able to identify specific relevant skills under these broad headings – for example, presentation or report writing under communication skills, networking under working with others, or facility with particular software packages under information skills. Looking at advertisements for appealing jobs can highlight other areas of strength and weakness. Remember to add experience as well as skills to your list. Again, your trawl of websites….

Action planning for self-development

Activity 16.4 Action planning for self-development

Develop a series of action plans for making yourself more employable by targeting key strengths and weaknesses. Now follow them! Monitor progress at regular intervals and update the plans regularly.

Activity 16.5 Exploring your vision

You can also ‘interrogate’ the vision you developed in Activity 16.1. What was it that felt good about the job you visualised? What does this tell you about yourself? Revisit Activity 1.5, with your initial thoughts on good and bad aspects of working life, and see how they have altered since then. If they have not altered much, or if you found your imagination didn’t come up with much, spend some time talking to family, friends, mature students and those who have had vacation jobs in order….

Strengthening your application

Activity 16.13 Strengthening your application

Pick a job for which you plan to apply. (If you are some way short of graduating, pick one that you might apply for if you were ready.) Find out as much as you can about the job, the organisation and the organisation’s competitive environment (customers and competitors). Then think about the ways in which you can use this information to identify the strengths you would want to offer and any weaknesses you might have. See whether you can complete a SWOT on yourself as a product for this particular customer, looking at opportunities and threats that the organisation might offer you, too. Modify your action plan if this suggests improvements.

This question uses the Macroeconomic Simulator available from the Carlin and Soskice website http://www.oup.com/uk/orc/carlinsoskice to show how the economy can get stuck in a deflation trap and what it can do to escape it.

This question uses the Macroeconomic Simulator available from the Carlin and Soskice website http://www.oup.com/uk/orc/carlinsoskice to show how the economy can get stuck in a deflation trap and what it can do to escape it. Start by opening the simulator and choosing the closed economy version. Then reset all shocks by clicking the appropriate button on the left hand side of the main page. Use the simulator and the content of this chapter to work through the following:

(a) Apply a temporary 8% negative demand shock. Save your data.

(b) Use the impulse response functions to help explain the path of the economy following the shock.

(c) Apply a temporary increase in public expenditure of 7% alongside the original demand shock. Save your data.

(d) Comment on the changes….

Use the headings listed previously, or any other framework that you have been given to prepare a general CV, aiming for the best possible layout and a maximum of two sides of A4.

Activity 16.14 Your basic CV

Use the headings listed previously, or any other framework that you have been given to prepare a general CV, aiming for the best possible layout and a maximum of two sides of A4. Aim to emphasise the strengths that you have with respect to employment in general. This will serve as the basis for any specific CV you use in applications, but remember that for each application you should see whether you can ‘version’ it to emphasise what is important for that job. Compare your CV with those of friends and/or others on your course to see whether you can, between you, find ways of improving them. Your university’s careers office may well have further guidance and examples. If not, you can easily….

Pick three financial institutions, one from the US, one from the UK and one from Continental Europe.

Pick three financial institutions, one from the US, one from the UK and one from Continental Europe. Download their annual reports for a pre—crisis year (i.e. before 2008). Use their balance sheets to ascertain whether these banks are best described as retail, investment or universal banks. How do the banks you have chosen vary in regard to the key concepts discussed in this chapter (refer to Chapters 5 and 6)? Your comparison should refer to:

(a) The leverage of each bank.

(b) The level of interconnectedness of each bank with governments and foreign banks.

(c) The holdings of mortgage-backed securities of each bank.

(d) The funding structure of each bank (e.g. debt vs. equity, short— vs. long-term).

In ‘Criminal Law and Cyberspace as a Challenge for Legal Research’ (2012) 9(3) Scripted, B-J Koops argues that (notes omitted):

In ‘Criminal Law and Cyberspace as a Challenge for Legal Research’ (2012) 9(3) Scripted, B-J Koops argues that (notes omitted):

Cyberspace should interest everyone who is involved in criminal law. The classic view of cybercrime, centred on the lonesome, nerdy hacker, is largely based on fiction, a fiction from the 1980s and 1990s. Reality has changed dramatically, causing a step-change in cybercrime and its consequences for the ‘real world’. Cybercrime is no longer about peer reputation among whiz kids, it’s all about money — big money. A considerable black market caters for all kinds of criminals, where you can buy a bunch of credit-card numbers (including the codes on the back) for a couple of dollars, or rent a network of zombie computers for an hour to spread….

In introducing the draft provision that was later enacted as s 477.3 (Unauthorised impairment of electronic communication) of the Criminal Code Act 1995 (Cth), the report of the Model Criminal Code Officers Committee of the Standing Committee of Attorneys-General, Chapter 4 — Damage and Computer Of ences and Amendments to Chapter 2: Jurisdiction, January 2001, pp 171–3, noted that the offence:

In introducing the draft provision that was later enacted as s 477.3 (Unauthorised impairment of electronic communication) of the Criminal Code Act 1995 (Cth), the report of the Model Criminal Code Officers Committee of the Standing Committee of Attorneys-General, Chapter 4 — Damage and Computer Of ences and Amendments to Chapter 2: Jurisdiction, January 2001, pp 171–3, noted that the offence:

… has an extremely broad band of application, from harms which are transient and trifling to conduct which results in serious economic loss or serious disruption of business, government or community activities. The prohibition would be breached by conduct which impaired communication of a single message of no importance.

Given that the offence carries a maximum penalty of imprisonment for 10 years, how are different levels of….

A Bergin and C Ungerer, ‘Homeward Bound: Australia’s New Counter-Terrorism White Paper’, Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI), Policy Analysis no. 57, March 2010, note:

A Bergin and C Ungerer, ‘Homeward Bound: Australia’s New Counter-Terrorism White Paper’, Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI), Policy Analysis no. 57, March 2010, note:

There are more than 4,000 terrorist-related websites worldwide. Ideas cross borders through cyberspace. We aren’t going to ban our way out of this problem. Cyberspace affords individuals access and anonymity in an extremist environment and the ability to find like-minded extremists in thousands of chat rooms and social networking sites.

To what extent can any government respond to online terrorist propaganda without compromising the availability and use of the Internet for legitimate, however contentious, political discussion and debate? How and where should the dividing line between free speech and community safety be made?