Daily Archives: October 25, 2021

A programme to roll out the reimaging of job centres across the UK was devised by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP).

A programme to roll out the reimaging of job centres across the UK was devised by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP). It was keen to make this an exemplary project and to drive out the waste it saw in the system by integrating the supply chain across the country. In procuring, it selected on the basis of 40 per cent on price and 60 per cent on quality. The DWP asked the lead contractor to form an integrated team comprising consultants, the client and supply chain representatives, with a virtual company ethos and a shared sense of commitment. Incentives were based on ‘team output’, which meant that the team worked together to optimise value and maximise supply chain expertise during the design process. A percentage of….

Lorries were loaded in the North and informally waited at a nearby service station on the motorway to take up the buffer of traffic delays.

Lorries were loaded in the North and informally waited at a nearby service station on the motorway to take up the buffer of traffic delays. Units were called onsite in the exact fixing sequence and were lifted up by mobile crane to four different gangs working simultaneously on separate parts of the site. Lorries delivered to ‘their’ gang at set intervals and were supported by a crane that lifted units into position and held them until fixed. Lorries for different gangs waited offsite until they could enter a single site access and be processed and driven to position. Gangs staggered their work to receive lorries at different start times and were trained to work to identical targets to maintain staggered deliveries.

A contract for student accommodation in the South-West involved elemental flat-pack concrete walls, floors and roof units, which slotted together with windows and services already installed in the units.

A contract for student accommodation in the South-West involved elemental flat-pack concrete walls, floors and roof units, which slotted together with windows and services already installed in the units. Accommodation for nearly 2000 students would take the form of several different multi-storey blocks and time was short. Units were delivered on edge in small numbers on the back of large articulated low loaders. There were 11,000 units to deliver and 300m2 per day were made at the factory. Four-hundred units could be fixed each day, which meant the manufacturer had to stockpile in advance of delivery.19 The contractor used six 100-tonne cranes. Gangs of workers were needed to bolt units together, place and structurally screed floors and put up edge protection for each six-person flat. Units were fair-faced internally and….

Turner & Townsend conduct a yearly survey of 43 construction locations on every continent.

Turner & Townsend conduct a yearly survey of 43 construction locations on every continent.30 In 2017, the five most expensive cities in the world in which to build were, on a simple US$ comparison, and in order of expense: New York, San Francisco, Zurich, Hong Kong and London. When a measure like PPP is used, which factors living costs with prices, London tops the bill and New York slips to twenty-first, though the differences do flatten out. For New York, the market issue is huge, and thus a factor of productivity, as other places in Britain have roughly the same PPP value as New York. Building prices inflated on average by 3.5 per cent, 2.7 per cent in advanced economies, and here building costs generally increase more than….

This project is an example of a highly intensive work programme in which any hold ups affect the critical path.

This project is an example of a highly intensive work programme in which any hold ups affect the critical path. The hands-off nature of the construction management function was only made possible by the setting up of well-prepared packages and a well-administered change control system. As most decisions for significant design change had to be made in New York where the client representative resides, this had the potential to delay the site team if the problems were not anticipated in good time or client changes were frequent. However, the co-location of an integrated design and construction management team onsite helped in getting design decisions implemented immediately. Giving ownership to the trade contractors by making day-to-day co-ordination their responsibility provided space for more advanced planning and contingency management.

The Superior Product Team was set up as a consortium of contractors, designers and the client to provide completed corridor units that fit inside a structural steel frame. Each prefabricated unit weighed 6.8 tonnes and was 4m long, 7m wide and 2.5m high. The units could be double-stacked or divided into two narrower corridors 3.5m wide (Figure 9.6). Each unit was externally cladded and glazed to provide a finished waterproof product bolted within the onsite in-situ steel frame. The units were complete with modular plug and fix heating, electrical and IT services. The steel frame was standalone and configured to the route of the corridor, which generally linked two buildings. In order to install the units within the frame, rails were fixed to the frame at the height of the floor and units were lifted into the frame by leaving out a section of the top frame structure (Figure 9.7). Units were lowered onto the rails and pushed along them until they met up with the last corridor unit; they were then sealed, bolted together and connected to services. This action was repeated for each corridor unit in both directions up to the access holes in the steel frame. Tolerance was critical, allowing the steel to be slightly out of true longitudinally; however, high tolerances were required on the rail level and the plumb of the structural columns to which the units were bolted top and bottom. Once a corridor was completed between the two buildings, the services could be hooked up, tested and commissioned.

The Superior Product Team was set up as a consortium of contractors, designers and the client to provide completed corridor units that fit inside a structural steel frame. Each prefabricated unit weighed 6.8 tonnes and was 4m long, 7m wide and 2.5m high. The units could be double-stacked or divided into two narrower corridors 3.5m wide (Figure 9.6). Each unit was externally cladded and glazed to provide a finished waterproof product bolted within the onsite in-situ steel frame. The units were complete with modular plug and fix heating, electrical and IT services. The steel frame was standalone and configured to the route of the corridor, which generally linked two buildings. In order to install the units within the frame, rails were fixed to the frame at the height….

The production line was set up in a factory close to site and units were stored for at least the capacity of a night’s work.

The production line was set up in a factory close to site and units were stored for at least the capacity of a night’s work. Night-time was when free access to the building works was usually guaranteed and was least disruptive to the client’s business. A single unit size was designed to fit on the back of a rigid bed lorry, similar in size to a large open-sided container, so needed to be braced to ensure safe transport. A unit was lifted straight off the lorries and into the in-situ structural steel frame. A multi-skilled production gang received the unit, manhandled it along the rails and installed it. Specialist ‘Hiab’ equipment was used to load and unload the units, saving on the constant hiring of cranage. The fixing….

Design changes resulted from a better integration of manufacture and installation.

Design changes resulted from a better integration of manufacture and installation. Quality improvement led to the re-engineering of brackets in order to make fixing easier and to cope with lesser tolerance onsite. The factory management stopped work on an ad-hoc basis when feedback was given, in order to give the whole workforce ‘one-point lessons’. This group learning process ensured equal delivery to all on a check, prevent and repair basis and saved the need for quality inspectors. Another problem was the deflection of the structural steel when fixing the units in the middle of spans, creating movement after two corridor units were complete and stressing the sealing between them. Both the design of the sealing and the rigidity of the structure were reviewed. Adjustments to the painting methodology….

Asbestos causes a risk to many people and its inappropriate handling in the past is now responsible for 1000s deaths per year.

Asbestos causes a risk to many people and its inappropriate handling in the past is now responsible for 1000s deaths per year. In order to counter further risk, most governments have legislated against the use of asbestos-based products. As many of these products have been incorporated in existing buildings, owners and tenants are also subject to managing the process (see Chapter 11). They are also charged with managing asbestos removal if it is disturbed by subsequent refurbishment or demolition, and with surveying the condition of asbestos in the building on a regular basis and especially prior to refurbishment. Only contractors who have been licensed to safely remove and dispose of hazardous waste in designated tips can remove asbestos. This is an example of a pure risk with mandatory….

The construction industry has improved its accident record in real terms by 30 per cent over the last decade (RIDDOR)7 ; however, self-reported injuries (LFSs) levelled out after a period of reduction.

The construction industry has improved its accident record in real terms by 30 per cent over the last decade (RIDDOR)7 ; however, self-reported injuries (LFSs) levelled out after a period of reduction. There are 30 per cent fewer accidents now than in 2000/01. However, fatality rates for the construction industry are still the third-worst in the UK, after agriculture and mining, although still comparatively good compared to European levels in general. It is easy to blame a ‘cowboy’ element in the construction industry for these figures, but it is clear that a major problem still exists. Injury and work-related illnesses are estimated to cost the industry £1 billion in equal proportions. The 1998 Egan Report8 claimed that accidents can account for 3.6 per cent of project costs, which….